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TDLC Investigators by Discipline

Are you a student interested in studying in a TLDC laboratory?
This page is a resource for prospective students interested in participating in a TDLC lab. The following is a list of TDLC investigators by discpline and institution:

 



Biology

UC San Diego logo University of California, San Diego - http://www.ucsd.edu/

The Salk Institute logo The Salk Institute - http://www.salk.edu/

Biology Department

Investigator: Fred Gage
Email: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
Web: http://www.salk.edu/faculty/faculty_details.php?id=23
Research: Fred Gage's focus is the adult central nervous system and unexpected plasticity and adaptability to environmental stimulation that remains throughout the life of all mammals. His work may lead to methods of replacing or enhancing brain and spinal cord tissues lost or damaged due to Neurodegenerative disease or trauma. Gage's lab showed that, contrary to accepted dogma, human beings are capable of growing new nerve cells throughout life. Small populations of immature nerve cells are found in the adult mammalian brain, a process called Neurogenesis. Gage is working to understand how these cells can be induced to become mature functioning nerve cells in the adult brain and spinal cord. They showed that environmental enrichment and physical exercise can enhance the growth of new brain cells and they are studying the underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms, that may be harnessed to repair the aged and damaged brain and spinal cord.

Investigator: Terrence Sejnowski
Email:
This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
Web: http://www.cnl.salk.edu
Research: The long range goal of our laboratory is to understand the computational resources of brains from the biophysical to the systems levels. The central issues being addressed are how dendrites integrate synaptic signals in neurons, how networks of neurons generate dynamical patterns of activity, how sensory information is represented in the cerebral cortex, how memory representations are formed and consolidated during sleep, and how visuo-motor transformations are adaptively organized.


UC Berkeley logo University of California, Berkeley - http://www.berkeley.edu/

Molecular and Cell Biology

Investigator: Yang Dan
Email: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
Web: http://mcb.berkeley.edu/index.php?option=com_mcbfaculty&name=dany
Research: Our research aims to elucidate (1) how visual information is encoded and processed in the mammalian brain, and (2) how neural circuits are shaped by visual experience.

Investigator: Dan Feldman
Email: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
Web: http://mcb.berkeley.edu/index.php?option=com_mcbfaculty&name=feldmand
Research: My laboratory studies the function and plasticity of the cerebral cortex at the synapse, cellular, and neural systems levels.

Investigator: Mu-Ming Poo
Email: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
Web: http://mcb.berkeley.edu/labs/poo/
Research: We are interested in understanding the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the guidance of nerve growth, the formation and plasticity of synapses, and activity-dependent modification of neural circuits.

 

Additional Information/Links


UC San Diego

Biological Sciences

Biological Sciences

Biological Sciences Graduate Information

 


The Salk Institute

Neuroscience Laboratories at The Salk Institute

 

 

UC Berkeley
Department of Molecular and Cell Biology

Department of Molecular and Cell Biology

Molecular & Cell Biology Graduate Program

 

Center for Human Development

UC San Diego logo University of California, San Diego - http://www.ucsd.edu/

Center for Human Development

Investigator: Gedeon Deak
Email: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
Web: http://www.cogsci.ucsd.edu/~deak/cdlab/
Research: Gedeon Deák asks how inexperienced organisms learn to select and respond to the most relevant information in complex, partly predictable, information-rich environments. He and his colleagues study the emergence of attention-sharing skills. They also perform empirical studies on children's biases in learning words and other kinds of information, such as facts and pictograms. Finally, Prof. Deák and his team study cognitive flexibility, which changes radically during childhood. They investigate how flexibility is related to other capacities such as inhibition, working memory for task cues, and processing speed.

Investigator: Jeffrey Elman
Email: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
Web: http://crl.ucsd.edu/~elman/
Research: My primary research interests are on language processing and learning. I study language both through computational models and also through psycholinguistic and neuroimaging studies.

Investigator: Terry Jernigan
Email:
This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
Web:
http://psychiatry.ucsd.edu/faculty/tjernigan.html
Research: Dr. Jernigan’s research employs magnetic resonance imaging and cognitive activation paradigms in studies of brain maturation and brain aging, CNS effects of HIV-infection, and neural effects of substance abuse. These studies link dynamic changes in tissue biology and patterns of brain activity to development, neurotoxicity, and disease progression, as well as to specific behavioral alterations. Dr. Jernigan is P.I. of several privately or publicly funded projects and her bibliography lists over a hundred research publications.

Investigator: Judy Reilly
Email: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
Web: http://www.psychology.sdsu.edu/new-web/facultystaff/reilly.html
Research: Overall our research interests lie in understanding the relations between our two primary communicative systems: language and emotion and their neural substrates. To better understand their development and the changing nature of the relations of these systems, we examine the developmental trajectories of language and emotion and contexts where they intersect in both typically and atypically developing children: children and adolescents with early unilateral brain damage, children with language impairment and children with Williams or Down Syndrome as well as typically developing individuals. Some current projects include: language and literacy development in different populations including oral and written narratives in children with early brain damage and children with language impairment. Emotion studies focus on social cognition, including children's developing abilities to recognize faces and emotional expression and to infer emotions in others.

 

Additional Information/Links

UC San Diego
Center for Human Development

Center for Human Development

 

 

 

 

Cognitive Science

UC San Diego logo University of California, San Diego - http://www.ucsd.edu/

Cognitive Science Department

Investigator: Andrea Chiba
Email:
This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
Web:
http://neurograd.ucsd.edu/faculty/detail.php?id=21
Research: Our laboratory is interested in gaining further knowledge of neural systems underlying affect, attention, learning, and memory. Our current research has diverged into two lines of investigation. The first line of research is focused on the neural systems underlying spatial attention. The second line of research is focused on the neural systems underlying the representation of affect.

Investigator: Virginia de Sa
Email: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
Web: http://www.cogsci.ucsd.edu/~desa/
Research: Our research goal is to better understand the neural basis of human perception and learning. We are interested in how we learn, both from a neural and computational point of view. We study the computational properties of machine learning algorithms and also investigate what physiological recordings and the constraints and limitations of human performance tell us about how our brains learn.

Investigator: Gedeon Deak
Email: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
Web: http://www.cogsci.ucsd.edu/~deak/cdlab/
Research: Gedeon Deák asks how inexperienced organisms learn to select and respond to the most relevant information in complex, partly predictable, information-rich environments. He and his colleagues study the emergence of attention-sharing skills. They also perform empirical studies on children's biases in learning words and other kinds of information, such as facts and pictograms. Finally, Prof. Deák and his team study cognitive flexibility, which changes radically during childhood. They investigate how flexibility is related to other capacities such as inhibition, working memory for task cues, and processing speed.

Investigator: Jeffrey Elman
Email: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
Web: http://crl.ucsd.edu/~elman/
Research: My primary research interests are on language processing and learning. I study language both through computational models and also through psycholinguistic and neuroimaging studies.

Investigator: Terry Jernigan
Email:
This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
Web:
http://psychiatry.ucsd.edu/faculty/tjernigan.html
Research: Dr. Jernigan’s research employs magnetic resonance imaging and cognitive activation paradigms in studies of brain maturation and brain aging, CNS effects of HIV-infection, and neural effects of substance abuse. These studies link dynamic changes in tissue biology and patterns of brain activity to development, neurotoxicity, and disease progression, as well as to specific behavioral alterations. Dr. Jernigan is P.I. of several privately or publicly funded projects and her bibliography lists over a hundred research publications.

Investigator: Howard Poizner
Email: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
Web: http://inc2.ucsd.edu/poizner/
Research: The long-range objective of the laboratory is to better understand the neural bases of human sensorimotor control and learning. Our approach is to analyze normal motor control and learning processes, and the nature of the breakdown in those processes in patients with selective failure of specific sensory or motor systems of the brain. Toward this end, we have developed novel methods of imaging and graphic analysis of spatiotemporal patterns inherent in digital records of movement trajectories. We monitor movements of the limbs, body, head, and eyes, both in real environments and in 3D multimodal, immersive virtual environments, and recently have added synchronous recording of high-definition EEG. One domain of our studies is Parkinson's disease. Our studies have been dissecting out those elements of sensorimotor processing which may be most impaired in Parkinsonism, and those elements that may most crucially depend upon basal ganglia function and cannot be compensated for by other brain systems. Since skilled movement and learning may be considered opposite sides of the same coin, we also are investigating learning in Parkinson’s disease: how Parkinson’s patients learn to adapt their movements in altered sensorimotor environments; how their eye-hand coordination changes over the course of learning sequences; and how their neural dynamics are altered when learning to make decisions based on reward.


Carnegie Mellon University logo Carnegie Mellon University - http://www.cmu.edu

Cognitive and Linguistic Sciences

Investigator: Michael Tarr
Email: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
Web: http://research.brown.edu/myresearch/Michael_Tarr
Research: Research interests are: visual object and face representation and recognition; perceptual categorization, learning, and expertise; how cognitive and perceptual knowledge interact; how the effects of illumination affect object perception and recognition; and visual navigation and scene representation in virtual environments.

 

Additional Information/Links

UC San Diego
Cognitive Science

Dept. of Cognitive Science Graduate Information

 

Carnegie Mellon University
Graduate Education

Psychology Graduate Program

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Computer Science

UC San Diego logo University of California, San Diego - http://www.ucsd.edu/

Computer Science & Engineering Department

Investigator: Garrison Cottrell
Email: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
Web: http://www.cs.ucsd.edu/~gary/
Research: My research concerns using neural networks as a computational model applied to problems in cognitive science and artificial intelligence, engineering and biology. I have had success using them for such disparate tasks as modeling how children acquire words, studying how lobsters chew, and nonlinear data compression.



University of Colorady, Boulder logo University of Colorado, Boulder - http://www.colorado.edu/

Computer Science Department

Investigator: Michael Mozer
Email: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
Web: http://www.cs.colorado.edu/~mozer/Home.html
Research: Research Interests include: * Using computational models to understand the mechanisms of human learning and cognition; * Particular focus has been in the areas of visual perception, selective attention, awareness, executive control, and neuropsychological disorders; * The adaptive house: a control system that learns to manage energy resources (air heat, water heat, lighting, and ventilation) in an actual residence to maximize the satisfaction of the inhabitants and minimize energy consumption; * Speech recognition: developing low-cost neural-net-based hardware for speaker-dependent and speaker-independent recognition (see Sensory, Inc.); * Data mining applications.


University of Washington logo University of Washington - http://www.washington.edu/

Applied Mathematics and Computer Science and Engineering

Investigator: Emanuel Todorov
Email: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
Web: http://www.cs.washington.edu/homes/todorov/
Research: The focus of our research is intelligent control in biology and engineering. We are trying to build a computational theory of the sensorimotor loops responsible for moment-to-moment control and test the theory experimentally. We are also developing biologically-inspired algorithms for optimal control of complex dynamics. The specific projects in the lab fall in several categories: developing efficient control algorithms suitable for biomechanical systems; constructing control-theoretic models of behavioral phenomena; testing model predictions in motor psychophysics experiments; implementing systems-level models in recurrent neural networks; building compliant robots which we hope to be able to control using our new algorithms.

 

Additional Information/Links

UC San Diego
Computer Science & Engineering

Department of Computer Science & Engineering, UC San Diego

Dept. of Computer Science & Engineering Graduate Education

University of Colorado, Boulder
Department of Computer Science,

Graduate Program - Department of Computer Science

 

University of Washington Department of Psychology

Department of Psychology Graduate Studies

 

 

 

Information Sciences / Information Technology

University of Pittsburgh logo University of Pittsburgh - http://www.pitt.edu/

School of Information Sciences

Investigator: Paul Munro
Email: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
Web: http://www.sis.pitt.edu/~pmunro
Research Interests: Neurobiological models, Hybrid systems with genetic algorithms, Data compression and error correction, Spatial cognition, Visualization of backprop learning



The University of Queensland, Australia logo The University of Queensland, Australia - http://www.uq.edu.au/

Information Technology & Electrical Engineering

Investigator: Janet Wiles
Email: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
Web: http://www.itee.uq.edu.au/~janetw/
Research Interests: Complex systems biology: modeling genetic regulatory networks, evolution of development, C. elegans lineage complexity; Computational neuroscience: human memory, hippocampus, neurogenesis in dentate gyrus; Evolution of language: evolving learnable languages, language for space, evolving robot languages; Modeling methods: Network analysis, Agent based systems, Complex Systems Patterns, Evolutionary Computation, Neural Networks, Machine Learning, Data Mining, Visualisation; Artificial Intelligence and Artificial Life: genotype to phenotype, morphology, cellular automata for active environments; Naturally Intelligent Systems: Human memory, language and cognition.

 

Additional Information/Links

University of Pittsburgh
School of Information Sciences

School of Information Sciences

 

University of Queensland, Australia
Graduate School

Graduate School

Institute for Neural Computation

UC San Diego logo University of California, San Diego - http://www.ucsd.edu/

Institute for Neural Computation

Investigator: Marian Stewart Bartlett
Email: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
Web: http://mplab.ucsd.edu/~marni/index.html
Research: I study learning in vision, with application to face recognition and expression analysis. One area of focus explores models of unsupervised learning and their application to face processing. Another major focus of my research is the development of automatic facial expression recognition systems. In collaboration with other members of the Machine Perception Lab, we have developed an end-to-end system for automatic recognition of a set of basic expressions that works in real-time. We have also made substantial progress toward fully automating the facial action coding system, a comprehensive facial expression description system developed by Paul Ekman and Wallace Friesen.

Investigator: Gwen Littlewort
Email: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
Web: http://mplab.ucsd.edu/~gwen/
Research: The goal of the MPLab is to develop systems that perceive and interact with humans in real time using natural communication channels. To this effect we are developing perceptual primitives to detect and track human faces and to recognize facial expressions. We are also developing algorithms for robots that develop and learn to interact with people on their own. Applications include personal robots, perceptive tutoring systems, and system for clinical assessment, monitoring, and intervention.

Investigator: Scott Makeig
Email: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
Web: http://sccn.ucsd.edu/~scott/
Research: My primary research interest is in analysis and modeling of human cognitive event-related brain dynamics as captured by high-dimensional EEG, MEG and other imaging modalities now including body motion capture. Brain imaging analysis approaches I and colleagues have pioneered include time-frequency analysis and independent component analysis (ICA), and neural network and machine learning methods.

Investigator: Javier Movellan
Email: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
Web: http://mplab.ucsd.edu/wordpress/
Research: The goal of the MPLab is to develop systems that perceive and interact with humans in real time using natural communication channels. To this effect we are developing perceptual primitives to detect and track human faces and to recognize facial expressions. We are also developing algorithms for robots that develop and learn to interact with people on their own. Applications include personal robots, perceptive tutoring systems, and system for clinical assessment, monitoring, and intervention.

Investigator: Howard Poizner
Email: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
Web: http://inc2.ucsd.edu/poizner/
Research: The long-range objective of the laboratory is to better understand the neural bases of human sensorimotor control and learning. Our approach is to analyze normal motor control and learning processes, and the nature of the breakdown in those processes in patients with selective failure of specific sensory or motor systems of the brain. Toward this end, we have developed novel methods of imaging and graphic analysis of spatiotemporal patterns inherent in digital records of movement trajectories. We monitor movements of the limbs, body, head, and eyes, both in real environments and in 3D multimodal, immersive virtual environments, and recently have added synchronous recording of high-definition EEG. One domain of our studies is Parkinson's disease. Our studies have been dissecting out those elements of sensorimotor processing which may be most impaired in Parkinsonism, and those elements that may most crucially depend upon basal ganglia function and cannot be compensated for by other brain systems. Since skilled movement and learning may be considered opposite sides of the same coin, we also are investigating learning in Parkinson’s disease: how Parkinson’s patients learn to adapt their movements in altered sensorimotor environments; how their eye-hand coordination changes over the course of learning sequences; and how their neural dynamics are altered when learning to make decisions based on reward.

Investigator: Terrence Sejnowski
Email:
This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
Web: http://www.cnl.salk.edu
Research: The long range goal of our laboratory is to understand the computational resources of brains from the biophysical to the systems levels. The central issues being addressed are how dendrites integrate synaptic signals in neurons, how networks of neurons generate dynamical patterns of activity, how sensory information is represented in the cerebral cortex, how memory representations are formed and consolidated during sleep, and how visuo-motor transformations are adaptively organized.

Additional Information/Links

Institute for Neural Computation (INC)

INC Website

INC Laboratories

Neuroscience


Brown University logo Brown University - http://www.brown.edu/
Neuroscience Department
Investigator:
David Sheinberg
Email: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
Web: http://charlotte.neuro.brown.edu/
Research: Current projects in the lab are exploring the dynamic nature of visual processing.



University of Colorady, Boulder logo University of Colorado, Boulder - http://www.colorado.edu/
Department of Psychology and Neuroscience

Investigator: Tim Curran
Email: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
Web: http://psych.colorado.edu/~tcurran/
Research: My research focuses on human learning and memory. I approach these topics from a cognitive neuroscience perspective with the goals of understanding the characteristics of mental processes and how they are realized within the brain. Most of my current research uses measures of brain electrical activity (ERPs) to study the brain processes that underlie recognition memory. In particular, ERPs are being used to dissociate the influences of recollection and familiarity on recognition memory. Other ongoing research, in collaboration with the Perceptual Expertise Network , uses ERPs to investigate the manner in which visual object recognition processes are influenced by expertise.

Investigator: Randy O'Reilly
Email: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
Web: http://psych.colorado.edu/~oreilly/
Research: I develop computational and formal models of the biological bases of cognition (computational cognitive neuroscience), focusing on specialization of function in and interactions between hippocampus, prefrontal cortex/basal ganglia, and posterior neocortex in learning, memory, attention, and controlled processing. I test predictions from these models using a range of behavioral and other experimental techniques.

NYU Langone University New York University - http://neuroscience.med.nyu.edu/

NYU Neuroscience Institute

Investigator:Gyorgy Buzsaki
Email: gyorgy.buzsaki@nyumc.org
Web: http://www.buzsakilab.com/
Research: In general terms, our main interest is how neuronal circuitries of the brain support its cognitive capacities. Our goal is to provide rational, mechanistic explanations of cognitive functions at a descriptive level. In our view, the most promising area of cognitive faculties for scientific inquiry is memory, since it is a well-circumscribed term, can be studied in animals and substantial knowledge has accumulated on the molecular mechanisms of synaptic plasticity.


Rutgers University logo Rutgers University - http://www.rutgers.edu/

Molecular and Behavioral Neuroscience

Investigator: April Benasich
Email: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
Web: http://babylab.rutgers.edu/personnel/benasich.html
Research: The research in my laboratory focuses on uncovering the neural processes necessary for normal cognitive and language development. Our ongoing longitudinal studies examining perceptual-cognitive abilities (habituation, recognition memory, cross-modal transfer) and auditory temporal processing in infancy are directed at determining how these abilities relate to later cognitive, linguistic, and behavioral outcomes in both normal infants and infants at risk for developmental delays. Early intervention programs, their impact on children and families, and the social policy implications of such interventions are also ongoing research foci.

Investigator: Paula Tallal
Email: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
Web: http://cmbn.rutgers.edu/research/tallal/
Research Interests: Cognitive Neuroscience, Language and Central Auditory Processing, Language-Learning Disabilities.



UC Berkeley logo University of California, Berkeley - http://www.berkeley.edu/

Department: Redwood Center for Theoretical Neuroscience

Investigator: Tony Bell
Email: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
Web:
https://redwood.berkeley.edu/wiki/Tony_Bell
Research interest: To unify ideas from probabilistic unsupervised machine learning with the cross-level information flows that occur in the biological hierarchy.


Univesity College London - https://www.ucl.ac.uk/npp/NeurosciencePhD/supervisors/kenneth_harris
Neuroscience - Cortical Processing Lab

Investigator: Kenneth Harris
Email: kenneth.harris@ucl.ac.uk
Web: https://www.ucl.ac.uk/npp/NeurosciencePhD/supervisors/kenneth_harris
Research Interests: Our research group studieshow the neurons of the cerebral cortex organize themselves together into a functional information processing system. We do this in a multidisciplinary way, including development of techniques to simultaneously record from large numbers of cells in the living brain; quantitative analysis of the resulting large-scale data sets; and theoretical modelling of brain circuits.

Additional Information/Links

Brown University
Neuroscience Department
Neuroscience Graduate Program

 

University of Colorado, Boulder Department of Psychology and Neuroscience

Department of Psychology and Neuroscience Graduate Program

 

Rutgers University
Molecular and Behavioral Neuroscience

Center for Molecular and Behavioral Neuroscience

 

UC Berkeley
Redwood Center for Theoretical Neuroscience

Redwood Center for Theoretical Neuroscience

 

 

Pediatrics



The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia Children's Hospital of Philadelphia - http://www.chop.edu
Pediatrics

Investigator: Robert Schultz
Email: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
Web: http://www.research.chop.edu/programs/car/
Research Interests: Our research is focused on understanding the causes of autism. Current projects are linking genetic susceptibility markers, to brain imaging findings and behavioral outcomes (including differences in response to treatment). While the focus of our work historically has been on the “social brain” (e.g., face perception and social cognition) using MRI, we are expanding our studies now to look more broadly at how different aspects of the autism phenotype (e.g, intellectual disability, co-morbid psychiatric symptoms) cluster across individuals and correlate with biomarkers and genetic risk markers. We also have an active program of research on training children with autism using computerized video gaming, and looking at reward mechanisms.

Additional Information/Links

Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

Neuroscience Research at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia

 

Psychology



University of Buffalo University at Buffalo SUNY - http://www.buffalo.edu/


Psychology

Investigator: Eduardo Mercado
Email: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
Web: http://www.psychology.buffalo.edu/directory/faculty/people/mercado/
Research: The Neural and Cognitive Plasticity Laboratory is dedicated to understanding how experience guides perception and thought. Currently, we are exploring how experience with complex sounds changes the way that brains process those sounds.


UC San Diego logo University of California, San Diego - http://www.ucsd.edu/

Psychology

Investigator: Hal Pashler
Email: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
Web: http://laplab.ucsd.edu/
Research: Interests include: Human Learning and Memory: Learning Mechanisms; Attention: Visual Attention, Multitasking, Visual Awareness; Enhancement of Learning and Training Based on Experimental Psychology Findings.


Carnegie Mellon University logo Carnegie Mellon University - http://www.cmu.edu

Psychology

Investigator: Marlene Behrmann
Email: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
Web: http://www.cnbc.cmu.edu/~behrmann/mb.htm
Research: Research in my lab focuses on studying the necessary psychological processes and representations that underlie abilities such as object segmentation and recognition, face recognition, mental imagery, reading and writing and spatial attention. Although these questions are asked within the framework of information-processing models used in cognitive psychology, I am also interested in identifying the neural mechanisms which are responsible for these complex abilities.


University of Colorady, Boulder logo University of Colorado, Boulder - http://www.colorado.edu/

Department of Psychology and Neuroscience

Investigator: Tim Curran
Email: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
Web: http://psych.colorado.edu/~tcurran/
Research: My research focuses on human learning and memory. I approach these topics from a cognitive neuroscience perspective with the goals of understanding the characteristics of mental processes and how they are realized within the brain. Most of my current research uses measures of brain electrical activity (ERPs) to study the brain processes that underlie recognition memory. In particular, ERPs are being used to dissociate the influences of recollection and familiarity on recognition memory. Other ongoing research, in collaboration with the Perceptual Expertise Network , uses ERPs to investigate the manner in which visual object recognition processes are influenced by expertise.

Investigator: Randy O'Reilly
Email: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
Web: http://psych.colorado.edu/~oreilly/
Research: I develop computational and formal models of the biological bases of cognition (computational cognitive neuroscience), focusing on specialization of function in and interactions between hippocampus, prefrontal cortex/basal ganglia, and posterior neocortex in learning, memory, attention, and controlled processing. I test predictions from these models using a range of behavioral and other experimental techniques.


San Diego State University logo San Diego State University - http://www.sdsu.edu/

Psychology Department

Investigator: Judy Reilly
Email: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
Web: http://www.psychology.sdsu.edu/new-web/facultystaff/reilly.html
Research: Overall our research interests lie in understanding the relations between our two primary communicative systems: language and emotion and their neural substrates. To better understand their development and the changing nature of the relations of these systems, we examine the developmental trajectories of language and emotion and contexts where they intersect in both typically and atypically developing children: children and adolescents with early unilateral brain damage, children with language impairment and children with Williams or Down Syndrome as well as typically developing individuals. Some current projects include: language and literacy development in different populations including oral and written narratives in children with early brain damage and children with language impairment. Emotion studies focus on social cognition, including children's developing abilities to recognize faces and emotional expression and to infer emotions in others.



Vanderbilt University logo Vanderbilt University - http://www.vanderbilt.edu/

Psychology Department

Investigator: Isabel Gauthier
Email: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
Web: http://gauthier.psy.vanderbilt.edu/index.html
Research: Object Perception Lab projects include: Comparing training experiences; Competition between domains of expertise; Expertise in the reading of musical notation; High resolution imaging; How categorization affects visual representations; Locus of holistic processing; What is the consequence of calling objects by their names; Working memory and holistic processing.

Investigator: Thomas Palmeri
Email: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
Web: http://catlab.psy.vanderbilt.edu/
Research: Our laboratory studies perceptual categorization, perceptual decision making, and perceptual expertise using a combination of behavioral experiments, computational modeling, and cognitive neuroscience techniques.


University of Victoria logo University of Victoria - http://www.uvic.ca/

Cognitive Psychology

Investigator: Daniel Bub
Email: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
Web: http://web.uvic.ca/psyc/bub.html
Research: I have developed a novel experimental method to assess the evocation of specific hand action representations to words, objects or sentences in real time. This approach requires subjects to carry out speeded reach and grasp actions on an eight-element response apparatus. Each element affords a unique action and subjects learn to produce a given manual action in response to a visual cue. We then measure the influence of an object, word or sentence (a priming event) on reach and grasp performance, time-locked to the visual cue, yielding evidence on the nature and time course of the motor representations evoked by the priming event. This research provides valuable convergent methods that will clarify evidence available from functional imaging research and from neuropsychology.

Investigator: Jim Tanaka
Email: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
Web: http://web.uvic.ca/psyc/tanaka.html
Research: My research examines the cognitive and neurological processes underlying object and face recognition. I am particularly interested in questions related to how experience influences the way we perceive and recognize objects in the world. To address these questions, we have been studying the perceptual processes involved in expert object recognition, such as birdwatching, and face recognition - a kind of perceptual expertise in which we are all experts. In a related line of research, we have been working with children with autism in a program designed to improve their face recognition abilities.

Additional Information/Links

University at Buffalo
Psychology Department

Psychology Graduate Department

 

UC San Diego
Department of Psychology


Dept. of Psychology Graduate Program

 

Carnegie Mellon University
Psychology Department
(note: Cognitive Neuroscience is an area of study within this department)

Psychology Department

 

University of Colorado, Boulder Department of Psychology and Neuroscience

Department of Psychology and Neuroscience Graduate Program

 

SDSU
Department of Psychology

Department of Psychology Graduate Programs

 

Vanderbilt University
Psychological Sciences

Psychological Sciences Graduate Program

 

University of Victoria
Cognitive Psychology

The Cognition and Brain Sciences Program

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Psychiatry

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Psychiatry

Investigator: Robert Clark
Email:
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Web: http://psychiatry.ucsd.edu/faculty/rclark.html
Research: We investigate the organization and neurological foundations of learning and memory. My work involves the study of rodents and combines the traditions of cognitive science and neuroscience. We have developed a model of human amnesia in the rat that involves the use of numerous behavioral tasks designed to measure memory in the rat and permanent lesions and sustained reversible lesions of various brain structures. We also use immediate early gene expression and radioactive isotopes to characterize the activity of brain structures. We also investigate the cognitive factors that are related to successful eyeblink classical conditioning in healthy human volunteers and neurological patients.

Investigator: Larry Squire
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Web: http://whoville.ucsd.edu/about.html
Research: Our interest is in the organization and structure of mammalian memory (humans and rodents) in terms of anatomy and function at the level of neural systems and cognition. Our research draws on the traditions of neuroscience, neuropsychology, and cognitive science. A part of our research involves studies of identified patients with amnesia. (Dr. Squire is recognized internationally for his research investigating the organization and neurological foundations of memory. His work has involved the study of neurological patients, neuroimaging, nonhuman primates and rodents, and combines the traditions of cognitive science and neuroscience).

 

Additional Information/Links

UC San Diego
Department of Psychiatry

Department of Psychiatry